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Does your university give consent to sexual health?

Universities have become the latest battleground for campaigns promoting sexual health awareness.

Sexual Jenga was one of the activities at the Guild stall. Photo Nigel Smith.

This week Curtin University held their annual sexual health campaign with the theme focusing on ‘rad sex and consent’. 

Rebecca Smith, Director of Brand and Stakeholder Relations at Sexual Health Quarters, defines enthusiastic consent.

Each day the Guild holds activities to raise awareness on consent and different techniques to bedroom play.  

Tuesday’s respect module workshop took a look inside the consent module and how respect is the most important part in the development of all sexual relationships. 

This was followed by Wednesday’s Creepy or Cute event which saw a light-hearted scenario-based game where participants decided whether situations were uncomfortable or simply futile flirtation. 

Non-profit organisation Sexual Health Quarters (SHQ) will lead the interactive workshop Pleasure Places of the Body, discussing sexual arousal points whilst keeping the theme of making sex pleasurable but responsible. 

Curtin is not the only university trying to raise awareness around topics in sexual health, with the University of Western Australia launching their Sexuality, Sexual Health and Relationships Education project (SHARE). 

SHARE aims to increase the positive attitudes, knowledge, skills and behaviour associated with sexuality, sexual health and relationships among their students. 

Curtin worship activities and sexual health mind map. Photo: Nigel Smith.

Director of Brand and Stakeholder Relations at Sexual Health Quarters Rebecca Smith says any form of promotion within universities is a positive step in the right direction and is essential to reducing the stigma around sexuality. 

“We are certainly happy to work with universities who are looking to incorporate more sexual health conversation and more sexual health awareness amongst their students, we think it’s a fantastic thing and are really happy to support it,” she said.

“For some people there is a level of stigma involved when it comes to sexual health and talking about that in safe environments can break down that stigma.

“Anything that gets people talking … that gets them feeling more comfortable talking and asking questions is a great thing.” 

Curtin will wrap the week up with their Pleasure Places of the Body collaborative workshop with SHQ which will discuss sexual arousal points whilst keeping the theme of making sex pleasurable but responsible. 

For any anonymous questions about sexual health contact the SHQ Helpline at https://shq.org.au/services/sexual-health-helpline/

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